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revolution - no more excuses

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america-wakiewakie:

Revealed: the Palestinian children killed by Israeli forces | The Telegraph 

More children than Palestinian fighters are being killed in Israel’s offensive on Gaza, according to the UN. Shown here are the name, age, and sex of 132 of those children, recorded by the Al Mezan Centre for Human Rights

The Nazis where gone in 10 years, but Jews are still killing Palestinians for 60 years now.

—(via basedinternet)

bootyregrit:

descentintotyranny:

Bloody Friday: 12 children among dozens killed in Israel’s merciless slaughter — Ali Abunimah

July 18 2014

The death toll from Israel’s assault on Gaza continues to rise rapidly.

At least 61 people, at least 12 of them children, were killed on Friday alone, the second day of Israel’s ground invasion of parts of the Gaza Strip, and the twelfth and bloodiest day since Israel began bombarding the territory with airstrikes and land-based and naval artillery.

Eight members of a single family, the youngest six months old, were killed when a missile struck their home.

By Friday evening Gaza time, 296 people had been killed and more than 2,200 injured since the Israeli bombardment began, according to Ma’an News Agency

But any death toll reported in the media is quickly out of date, as the numbers keep rising.

Eighty percent of the fatalities are civilians and half of the injured are women and children, according to the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

At least 58 of the dead are children, according to Dr. Ashraf al-Qidra, the health ministry spokesperson in Gaza.

Gaza residents and journalists have reported heavy and indiscriminate shelling across the coastal strip.

Read More

The ONLY story I saw in the australian news yesterday was ‘Israel agrees to a truce after boys killed on beach’. Right? Some fucking truce.

mollyfamous:

It’s genocide, that your US Tax dollars help fund,

mollyfamous:

It’s genocide, that your US Tax dollars help fund,

america-wakiewakie:

WHAT TO DO ABOUT GAZA
I have seen a lot of people in my life, myself included, going through hard times right now with the extreme escalation of colonial violence in Palestine. People are sad, angry, and praying. Many people are overwhelmed. Worried for our families. Many people in our communities are learning more about Palestine for the first time, and want to know ways to connect. It’s hard to know what to do from so far away, and easy to feel helpless when you don’t know what to do.
This list is for all of us, to recommit to the work we’ve been doing, to get grounded when this massacre has knocked us off our feet, and to get connected where we haven’t been before.
Please share with your communities!
1. BDS – BOYCOTT, DIVESTMENT, & SANCTIONS
Boycott, divestment, and sanctions (BDS) is a movement that was called for by Palestinian civil society. It is a grassroots, nonviolent form of resistance that there are so many ways to participate in.
Here is the Palestinian Civil Society Call for Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions.
Divestment: 
Get involved with (or start) a campaign for your university, workplace, union, etc. to pull out its investments in companies that are connected to Israeli human rights offenses. 
Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) has led many successful divestment campaigns at universities across the country, (click here to get involved). 
We Divest is a project of Jewish Voice for Peace, which has successfully pressured TIAA-CREF around its occupation investments (click here to get involved). 
Consumer Boycott:
Here is a quick list of companies that profit from Israeli human rights offenses.
Consumer boycott is about individually deciding not to buy these products, but it’s also about popular education. Flyering to educate people about what’s behind this stuff. Encouraging local shops not to sell these products. There are ongoing successful consumer boycott campaigns against SodaStream and Sabra Hummus, for example.Cultural and Academic Boycott:
As artists and academics, it’s very important that we decolonize the way we produce our work, and don’t let it be used to normalize violent structures.
There is a set of guidelines for cultural and academic boycott from the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI) that artists and academics can sign on to (Academic boycott guidelines here & Cultural boycott guidelines here). 
If you are an Israeli citizen, you can also sign the Boycott from Within statement, and get involved with their work (click here to get involved).
An excellent resource, which can help you find information for whichever kind of BDS campaign you decide to get involved with, is the Who Profits? database.
2. DONATE
Donating money is not an action that everyone can afford to get involved with, but if you have even a small amount to spare, here are some great places to donate to:
Middle East Children’s AlliancePalestinian Center for Human RightsAmerican Near East Refugee Aid (ANERA)United Palestinian Appeal
3. PARTICIPATE IN LOCAL PROTESTS & VIGILS
Protests and vigils are a great way to make the Palestinian struggle visible in your city, and also to build community with other people who are feeling the same way you are.
If you go to a protest, come through with good friends that you can trust, and have a plan for what to do if police or counterprotestors escalate.For organizers: Palestinian liberation is connected so intricately with all of our liberation. Reach out to members of other oppressed communities and build coalitions, feature their voices at your demonstration (for example, African, Latin@, and Indigenous activists). Keep racial, gender, and disability justice as the foundations of your work.
4. MAKE ART! & SUPPORT ARTISTS
This is giving us a whole lot of feelings, right?! Write/draw/paint/act/sing/print/dance it out! Bring attention to Gaza and Palestine within your artistic communities.
Endorse the USACBI statement, commit to its principles. Educate other artists you know about it, and encourage them to sign as well. Tell your story and tell it true. Be ethical and accountable in the way you handle the stories of others.
If you are not an artist: Help support Palestinian artists, and artists from other communities in struggle against Israeli apartheid. Donate, purchase work, host events, for example.
5. CHECK YOURSELF
Make sure that the information you have is accurate. Behind every single news story is a human being with a life as full as your own, and you owe it to them to get the facts straight. Do not re-post gory images of dead children on social media with no context—this is extremely disrespectful.
Below are a few (but not the only) reliable English-language news sources:
Palestinian Centre for Human RightsThe Electronic IntifadaAl Jazeera EnglishMa’an News AgencyJadaliyya
Read and understand the BDS call, and its demands and guidelines, and do not present false information about it. This is very important, because oftentimes even people who are part of the Palestine solidarity movement can misunderstand the guidelines, and fall for Zionist misinformation about them. Read the calls for yourself and figure out how you can plug in. (see above for the guidelines). Think about what your role is in this movement. 
Ask yourself some questions before you take action:
What is your relationship to Israeli apartheid historically, and the recent colonial violence?
What are you directly complicit in and what can you do to address that?
Who are you being accountable to?
Amplify the voices of, and support people who are more directly impacted than you. Step back when you need to and when you are told to. Avoid false and oppressive binaries, like Arab/Jew. Remember that Israeli apartheid is a multi-layered system, and bring that understanding to your work. Think about your social position in the country where you’re doing this work, and consistently check yourself on this, too. Again, keep racial, gender, and disability justice as the foundations of your work. Don’t judge people for not being able to take part in the same forms of resistance as you.
6. TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF & EACH OTHER
Mourn the dead. Speak their names. Publicly and privately. Do rituals if this helps you.
Read/watch/listen to/share poems/music/film/art by Palestinian artists.
Make art. (even if you are not “an artist.”)
Write it out. (even if you are not “a writer.”)
Cook Palestinian food. Share it with your loved ones.
Take time and space to feel.
Lean on your friends and let them lean on you.
Tune out the news if you need to. (Keep the news on, if you need to be reassured by the steady flow of information.)
Don’t go to protests/demos/events alone.
Take alone time if you need it.
Turn to your faith if that helps you.
Stay committed to healing, and recognize healing as part of the work.
If you are close with them, stay in touch with your family and friends in Palestine.
Remember, it is not your responsibility to educate your oppressors!
Keep checking yourself. 
“We teach life, sir” by Rafeef Ziadah 
“What I Will” by Suheir Hammad
Affirm life. Affirm life. Affirm life.
Editor’s Note: This submission’s author wished to remain anonymous. Feel free to add to this list upon sharing, and please, please, signal boost!

america-wakiewakie:

WHAT TO DO ABOUT GAZA

I have seen a lot of people in my life, myself included, going through hard times right now with the extreme escalation of colonial violence in Palestine. People are sad, angry, and praying. Many people are overwhelmed. Worried for our families. Many people in our communities are learning more about Palestine for the first time, and want to know ways to connect. It’s hard to know what to do from so far away, and easy to feel helpless when you don’t know what to do.

This list is for all of us, to recommit to the work we’ve been doing, to get grounded when this massacre has knocked us off our feet, and to get connected where we haven’t been before.

Please share with your communities!

1. BDS – BOYCOTT, DIVESTMENT, & SANCTIONS

Boycott, divestment, and sanctions (BDS) is a movement that was called for by Palestinian civil society. It is a grassroots, nonviolent form of resistance that there are so many ways to participate in.

Here is the Palestinian Civil Society Call for Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions.

Divestment: 

Get involved with (or start) a campaign for your university, workplace, union, etc. to pull out its investments in companies that are connected to Israeli human rights offenses. 

Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) has led many successful divestment campaigns at universities across the country, (click here to get involved). 

We Divest is a project of Jewish Voice for Peace, which has successfully pressured TIAA-CREF around its occupation investments (click here to get involved). 

Consumer Boycott:

Here is a quick list of companies that profit from Israeli human rights offenses.

Consumer boycott is about individually deciding not to buy these products, but it’s also about popular education. Flyering to educate people about what’s behind this stuff. Encouraging local shops not to sell these products. There are ongoing successful consumer boycott campaigns against SodaStream and Sabra Hummus, for example.
Cultural and Academic Boycott:

As artists and academics, it’s very important that we decolonize the way we produce our work, and don’t let it be used to normalize violent structures.

There is a set of guidelines for cultural and academic boycott from the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI) that artists and academics can sign on to (Academic boycott guidelines here & Cultural boycott guidelines here). 

If you are an Israeli citizen, you can also sign the Boycott from Within statement, and get involved with their work (click here to get involved).

An excellent resource, which can help you find information for whichever kind of BDS campaign you decide to get involved with, is the Who Profits? database.

2. DONATE

Donating money is not an action that everyone can afford to get involved with, but if you have even a small amount to spare, here are some great places to donate to:

Middle East Children’s Alliance
Palestinian Center for Human Rights
American Near East Refugee Aid (ANERA)
United Palestinian Appeal

3. PARTICIPATE IN LOCAL PROTESTS & VIGILS

Protests and vigils are a great way to make the Palestinian struggle visible in your city, and also to build community with other people who are feeling the same way you are.

If you go to a protest, come through with good friends that you can trust, and have a plan for what to do if police or counterprotestors escalate.
For organizers: Palestinian liberation is connected so intricately with all of our liberation. Reach out to members of other oppressed communities and build coalitions, feature their voices at your demonstration (for example, African, Latin@, and Indigenous activists). Keep racial, gender, and disability justice as the foundations of your work.

4. MAKE ART! & SUPPORT ARTISTS

This is giving us a whole lot of feelings, right?! Write/draw/paint/act/sing/print/dance it out! Bring attention to Gaza and Palestine within your artistic communities.

Endorse the USACBI statement, commit to its principles. Educate other artists you know about it, and encourage them to sign as well. 
Tell your story and tell it true. Be ethical and accountable in the way you handle the stories of others.

If you are not an artist: Help support Palestinian artists, and artists from other communities in struggle against Israeli apartheid. Donate, purchase work, host events, for example.

5. CHECK YOURSELF

Make sure that the information you have is accurate. Behind every single news story is a human being with a life as full as your own, and you owe it to them to get the facts straight. Do not re-post gory images of dead children on social media with no context—this is extremely disrespectful.

Below are a few (but not the only) reliable English-language news sources:

Palestinian Centre for Human Rights
The Electronic Intifada
Al Jazeera English
Ma’an News Agency
Jadaliyya

Read and understand the BDS call, and its demands and guidelines, and do not present false information about it. This is very important, because oftentimes even people who are part of the Palestine solidarity movement can misunderstand the guidelines, and fall for Zionist misinformation about them. Read the calls for yourself and figure out how you can plug in. (see above for the guidelines). Think about what your role is in this movement.

Ask yourself some questions before you take action:

  • What is your relationship to Israeli apartheid historically, and the recent colonial violence?
  • What are you directly complicit in and what can you do to address that?
  • Who are you being accountable to?

Amplify the voices of, and support people who are more directly impacted than you. Step back when you need to and when you are told to. Avoid false and oppressive binaries, like Arab/Jew. Remember that Israeli apartheid is a multi-layered system, and bring that understanding to your work. Think about your social position in the country where you’re doing this work, and consistently check yourself on this, too. Again, keep racial, gender, and disability justice as the foundations of your work. Don’t judge people for not being able to take part in the same forms of resistance as you.

6. TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF & EACH OTHER

  • Mourn the dead. Speak their names. Publicly and privately. Do rituals if this helps you.
  • Read/watch/listen to/share poems/music/film/art by Palestinian artists.
  • Make art. (even if you are not “an artist.”)
  • Write it out. (even if you are not “a writer.”)
  • Cook Palestinian food. Share it with your loved ones.
  • Take time and space to feel.
  • Lean on your friends and let them lean on you.
  • Tune out the news if you need to. (Keep the news on, if you need to be reassured by the steady flow of information.)
  • Don’t go to protests/demos/events alone.
  • Take alone time if you need it.
  • Turn to your faith if that helps you.
  • Stay committed to healing, and recognize healing as part of the work.
  • If you are close with them, stay in touch with your family and friends in Palestine.
  • Remember, it is not your responsibility to educate your oppressors!
  • Keep checking yourself. 
  • “We teach life, sir” by Rafeef Ziadah 
  • “What I Will” by Suheir Hammad
  • Affirm life. Affirm life. Affirm life.

Editor’s Note: This submission’s author wished to remain anonymous. Feel free to add to this list upon sharing, and please, please, signal boost!

1love-1ummah:

Palestine has no navy, no Air Force and no army. Israel isn’t waging a war, this is genocide against civilians!

1love-1ummah:

Palestine has no navy, no Air Force and no army. Israel isn’t waging a war, this is genocide against civilians!

sustainableprosperity:

Army Violently Stops African Refugees Trying to Leave Israel

Published on Jul 6, 2014

Sudanese and Eritrean refugees in Israel’s so-called “open prison” go on hunger strike after failed attempt to leave for Egypt

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Today in history: July 8, 1972 – Palestinian leader Ghassan Kanafani assassinated along with his niece by the Israeli Mossad with a car bomb in Beirut. 
Kanafani was a well-known Palestinian writer and was a leader and spokesperson of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine. 
PFLP statement on 41 years since martyrdom of Ghassan Kanafani
Video of Kanafani’s funeral in Beirut
Via Freedom Road Socialist Organization (Fight Back!)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Today in history: July 8, 1972 – Palestinian leader Ghassan Kanafani assassinated along with his niece by the Israeli Mossad with a car bomb in Beirut.

Kanafani was a well-known Palestinian writer and was a leader and spokesperson of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine.

PFLP statement on 41 years since martyrdom of Ghassan Kanafani

Video of Kanafani’s funeral in Beirut

Via Freedom Road Socialist Organization (Fight Back!)

Preparing for spontaneous events doesn’t mean waiting for them – it means living our lives in conflict so that those spontaneous explosions of rebellion feel like a continuation of antagonism that permeates our lives, not like ‘the big game’ that we’ve been preparing for.

—Conflict & Self Critique: May Day and Beyond (via ninjabikeslut)

cross-connect:

Stephen Tompkins

"Just as an LSD stamp distorts our vision , the paintings of Stephen Tompkins reforms our perception. Continuously changing from background to foreground, we are following lines and have been trapped trying to find a figurative form or an organized chaos, we are caught red-handed trying to find the beginning or the end. Stephen Tompkins multilayered visions experiences with the abundance of informations and the power of chance . His anti natural cartoon forms seem suddenly organic. Well known strokes of our childhood are losing their original forms , abandoned in their transparencies, they build a space of permanent metaphors suggesting the ugliness of truth. The amount of unfinished bodies sporadically crossed by precedent or future layers are vanishing the figurative into abstract. Those humorous see-throughs are far of just satisfying some esthetic purpose , they succeed reminding us to the vulnerability of humanity and the fragile aspect of beauty. Stephen Tompkins has reached the point where he redefines the difference beetween a painting which is directly self displaying or the one doing it through illustration." - Jaybo AKA Monk, Artist

Selected and Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

c4ss:

NYPD Beat this Man for Sleeping on the Train on His Way Home From Work

A disturbing video was submitted to the Free Thought Project, via facebook, which shows a New York man being assaulted by NYPD cops.

The alleged reason for the police harassment was that he fell asleep on the train.

In the video we can hear the man plea with police to allow him to stay on the train so he can get home. He was on his way home from work, according to the video.

The situation quickly escalates to violence and several officers begin beating the man with batons.

Finally 2 large NYPD cops rush onto the train and take this otherwise peaceful man down.

dronestagram:

June 18 2014: 4-8 people killed and several injured when up to six missiles hit a house on the outskirts of Miranshah in the early hours. #drone #drones #pakistan (at Dandy Darpakhel, North Waziristan)

dronestagram:

June 18 2014: 4-8 people killed and several injured when up to six missiles hit a house on the outskirts of Miranshah in the early hours. #drone #drones #pakistan (at Dandy Darpakhel, North Waziristan)

america-wakiewakie:

There’s a Huge Crackdown Happening in the West Bank – and No One Is Talking About It | World Mic

It was Thursday night when Gilad Shaer, Naftali Frenkel and Eyal Ifrach disappeared. The three Israeli teenagers were hitchhiking home from their schools in the West Bank, and were last seen near Gush Etzion, a settlement bloc. They never made it home. 

Seven days have now passed since the disappearance, and in that time Palestinian life has been plunged into fear and disarray. In what is now clearly much more than a bid to return missing teenagers, Israeli forces have unleashed a military crackdown on the West Bank — a crackdown that, for all its punitive brutality, is yet to attract real scrutiny from the global media. 

In Israeli media it was presumed that the young settlers had been abducted, and officials pinned the blame on Hamas. The militant organization denied any involvement, but the incident was soon being reported globally as a Hamas terror attack, with international condemnation and coverage of the kidnapping featuring on U.S. news. By the end of the weekend, the flurry of attention on the abduction was reaching its peak.

For Palestinians, however, the crackdown had just begun. On Sunday night, the West Bank city of Hebron was shut down as troops began to search from house to house. Couples were woken at gunpoint in the dark, groceries scattered across kitchens, men blindfolded and cuffed in their living rooms. Doors were blasted open, and an 8-year-old was seriously injured by shrapnel. In the Jalazon refugee camp, 20-year-old Ahmad Sabarin took a bullet to the chest; he died in hospital.

That first night, 140 people were arrested, supposedly “terror suspects” associated with the kidnapping. But neither this, nor the disproportional military siege unfolding in the West Bank, made the global headlines: For editors in the U.S., it seemed a sidenote compared to the disappearance of the three settlers.

In just the past few hours, a 14-year-old boy, Mahmoud Dudeen, and 22-year-old Mustafa Aslan were both shot dead by Israeli forces. Now, nights from Bethlehem to Jenin are disturbed by blasts as soldiers patrol the streets and storm houses, dispersing stone-throwing youth with live fire and sound grenades. Airstrikes are in full force over Gaza, and on June 18, Palestine’s top university was raided. Both Palestinians and Israelis say this is the biggest West Bank mobilization since the second Intifada.

"We are seeing a total shutdown of what was an already desperate situation," Mahmoud Subuh, from the Balata refugee camp in Nablus, told Mic. “Wednesday night, 20 to 30 houses were raided here. The whole third floor of one house was destroyed. The crackdown is really serious, and everyone is confused and hopeless. No one wants this violence again.”

Is this desperation a news story? It doesn’t seem so. In the U.S. media, coverage has been sparse — eyebrow-raising, given the level of violence. And while the strongest international condemnation has zeroed in on the kidnapping, no esteemed voices have criticized the deaths of Ahmad Sabareen, Mustafa Aslan, Mahmoud Dudeen or Ali al-Awoor, a 7-year-old boy also killed by Israeli fire this week.

This pattern is familiar. When Eyad, Gilad and Naftali disappeared, some 130 prisoners in Israeli jails were on the brink of death after more than fifty days on hunger strike against administrative detention, a practice that means they are imprisoned without charge, sometimes for years. The youngest striker, at 19, is the same age as one of the kidnapped boys. Yet his plight — and that of the 196 Palestinian minors imprisoned, often for stone-throwing, in Israeli jails — has gone largely unnoticed by the wider world.

The enormous wave of arrests that followed the kidnapping, too, has itself escaped serious censure. Since the boys’ disappearance on Thursday, at least 300 Palestinians have been arrested. None have been charged (many will be put in administrative detention) and the majority are members of Hamas.

(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: AP)

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